Fire Consumes Cleaning Service Van In Craig

A fire this afternoon at 530 5th Avenue West in Craig completely destroyed the Just Done Right carpet cleaning van owned Jared Kitchen.  According to Troy Hampton with the Craig Fire Department, a mechanical failure is suspected to have ignited the fire.  No other property was damaged in the blaze which took about 30 minutes to extinguish although one firefighter was taken to the Memorial Hospital and treated for heat exhaustion.


CITY OF CRAIG AND VFW COME TO AGREEMENT ON PARK LEASE

The City of Craig has come to an agreement with the VFW on Veterans Memorial Park.  The negotiations regarding the city’s lease of the park had been stalled, but the two sides have finally come to a lease agreement that both can be happy with.  Veterans Memorial Park is also known as the south side of Craig City Park.  The City will lease the park from the VFW for $5,000 per year, which will cover the VFW’s expenses.  That number can be adjusted as needed.  The lease covers 10 years.

 

MILK CREEK FIRE BEING ALLOWED TO BURN

The Milk Creek Fire, about 15 miles northeast of Meeker and about 3 and a half miles east of Yellowjacket Pass, was reported on July 4.  The fire is now approximately five acres and slowly burning in an aspen/conifer stand. Officials are managing the fire to reduce dead and downed vegetation within the area and to improve forest health. The White River Fire Module, specializing in these type fires, says the fire will not become large.  The threat to private lands is low.  In the coming weeks people will occasionally see smoke as the fire consumes downed woody material and standing trees. There could also be days when the fire consumes several acres and puts up a lot of smoke.

 

MOFFAT COUNTY RESIDENT TO OPERATE FUR FARM

Moffat County resident Sherman Romney asked the commissioners for a conditional use permit for a fur farm Tuesday.  Romney plans to raise minks on his land near Moffat County Road 30.  The county’s planning department wanted to verify the size and number of buildings that would be used to shelter the animals, and how many minks Romney planned to keep.  Romney said initially he will have about 200 minks, and while only one building would be built to start with, another 2 could be built if the business grows.  Romney also mentioned that no wells would have to be drilled for water.  The commissioners approved the conditional use permit.

 

CRAIG MAYOR SAYS COUNCIL WILL TAKE WAIT-AND-SEE APPROACH WITH RETAIL POT

Craig Mayor Terry Carwile says the main reason the Craig City Council decided to keep their moratorium on retail marijuana businesses in Craig is simply because the state doesn’t yet have its ducks in a row.  Carwile says with state regulations up in the air, the council doesn’t feel now is the time to lift that moratorium.  And even when the state does finalize those regulations, the council will likely take a wait-and-see approach to the shops, in order to observe how other communities operate under the laws.  However, the council did order staff to look into drafting an ordinance that would make Craig one of the cities to opt-out of the Amendment 64 allowances.  While Carwile says any city ordinance can be repealed at any time, comments made by council members based on their own personal values indicate the measure won’t be repealed by the current council.

 

SHERIFFS AND STATE COME TO AGREEMENT ON MAGAZINE LIMITS

A group of county sheriffs have reached a couple of agreements with the state regarding the sheriffs’ lawsuit over new gun laws.  The sheriffs are suing the state over laws they say are too vague and unenforceable.  The state has agreed to limit how it enforces those laws.  The agreement says that magazines do not violate the ban simply because they have removable base plates.  Most magazines have removable base plates to allow them to be cleaned and maintained, but extenders can be added to the bottom of many models to increase their capacity.  The two sides also agreed on a separate issue over a requirement that owners of “grandfathered” magazines must maintain continuous possession of the magazines in order to keep them legal. The two sides said that simply lending a magazine or handing it over to a gun shop to be maintained, does not violate the law. In order to break continuous possession, the owner would have to willingly give up ownership of the magazine.  The agreement does not end the sheriffs’ lawsuit, but rather clears up some immediate issues.  The sheriffs hope for a trial later, claiming the magazine limits and the universal background check law violate the Second Amendment.

 

STATE REPRESENTATIVE TRYING TO EASE BANKING RESTRICTIONS FOR POT BUSINESSES

Congress members from Colorado and Washington are planning to try again to help marijuana business access banking services.  A bill introduced yesterday revives an effort to shield financial institutions from prosecution if they allow marijuana businesses to access any banking services.  Financial institutions now violate federal drug law if they allow marijuana banking, leaving the industry running on mostly cash in the states that allow marijuana. The pot banking bill would allow businesses to make deposits, apply for loans and accept credit cards.  Colorado Representative Ed Perlmutter and Washington Representative Denny Heck are lead sponsors. The measure faces dim prospects in the Republican-controlled House.

 

DEADLY PIG VIRUS HITS COLORADO

An assistant state veterinarian for the Colorado Department of Agriculture says officials are trying to contain the spread of a virus that threatens the Colorado pork industry.  Doctor Nick Striegel says the Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus was thought to exist only in Europe and China. Colorado and 14 other states began reporting the virus in April, and officials confirmed its presence in May.  The virus causes severe diarrhea, vomiting and dehydration in pigs. The mortality rate can be as high as 100 percent in some facilities for nursing pigs.