NORTHWEST COLORADO NEWS FOR SATURDAY, JUNE 1ST

CHARGES FILED AGAINST LESYSHEN

The 14th Judicial District Attorney’s Office has filed official charges against Lisa Marie Lesyshen of 1st Degree murder, domestic violence, and child abuse resulting in death.  That’s according to court documents, which also say Lesyshen shot her son 5 times at close range early Wednesday morning, before trying to get her estranged husband to kill her.  Michael Kirlan instead called authorities, who found Lesyshen with a self-inflicted gunshot wound when they arrived.  A 1st Degree murder conviction could result in the death penalty, but the D.A. hasn’t said whether that would be pursued.  Lesyshen is still hospitalized for now.  Memorial services for Asher Lesyshen-Kirlan will be held Monday at Howelson Hill.

 

PARKS AND WILDLIFE FREE FISHING WEEKEND

Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s annual Free Fishing Weekend is today and tomorrow. Each year, the agency designates the first weekend in June as the only two-day period that anglers all around the state are not required to have a fishing license. For the rest of the year a fishing license is required for anyone 16 years and older. In conjunction, Hayden will have their Huck Finn Fun Day at Dry Creek Park today. Parks and Wildlife will provide as much of the fishing equipment as they can. The fishing Derby starts at 10, and there’ll be various prize categories. At noon, the party moves inside the Pavillion for lunch provided by Hayden Parks and Rec. There will also be Huck Finn and Becky Thatcher look-a-like contests.

 

BARKEY CHOSEN BY HICKENLOOPER TO SERVE ON STATE BOARD

14TH Judicial District Attorney Brett Barkey has been tapped by Governor John Hickenlooper to serve on the Colorado Coroners Standards and Training Board.  Hickenlooper announced numerous board and Commission appointments yesterday.  The Colorado Coroners Standards and Training Board develops the curriculum for a 40-hour training course for new coroners; approves the qualifications of the instructors who teach the course; approves training providers to certify coroners in basic medical-legal death investigation; and approves training providers and programs for the annual sixteen-hour in-service training requirement.  Barkey’s term on the board runs through March 31st of next year.

 

STEAMBOAT TO REMOVE DEAD TREES AT HOWELSON HILL

The City of Steamboat Springs has contracted with a local logger to remove about 25 mature Douglas-fir trees from the Howelsen Hill Ski Jump Complex starting tomorrow.  This work follows the treatments started last spring. A forest health assessment conducted by the Colorado State Forest Service last week indicated that there are still trees on the hill infested by Douglas-fir beetles — close relatives of the mountain pine beetles that have affected millions of acres of lodgepole pine forest in Colorado. A combination of timely tree removal, pheromone deployment and continued monitoring is expected to help in the control and abatement of the Douglas-fir beetle problem in the forested area around the jumps.  Another significant reason for removing the trees is that, when dead, they represent a hazard to recreational users and the ski jumps themselves.  Trail closures will be necessary during the removal phase of the work and the city requests that all trail users respect the closures for safety reasons.  A crew will be working on site felling dead and infected trees during the next week.

 

SERIES OF ANIMAL CROSSING POINTS PLANNED FOR HIGHWAY 9

Colorado Parks and Wildlife is asking hunters, anglers, skiers, outdoor recreationists and the general public to join the agency in support of the ‘Highway 9 Safety Project’. This Colorado Department of Transportation project includes the construction of wildlife overpasses and underpasses to help reduce vehicle/wildlife collisions on a 10.6-mile stretch of Highway 9 in Grand County, between Green Mountain Reservoir and the Colorado River near Kremmling.  According to CDOT, wildlife collisions in this area have led to nearly 600 vehicular accidents in the last 20 years, including 16 human fatalities and almost 200 injuries.  Thirty-five percent of the collisions were wildlife related. In addition, there have been nearly 450 animals killed – mostly mule deer – in the last eight years alone.  The plan calls for the construction of two overpasses and five underpasses designed specifically for wildlife and will be the first of its kind in Colorado.  They will allow animals to pass as motorists travel safely above or below.  Other improvements to the highway’s infrastructure include widening of the shoulders and improvements to sightlines.  Similar highway wildlife crossing have been built in other countries and throughout the United States, including Wyoming, Florida and California.

 

HEPATITIS A OUTBREAK LINKED TO BERRIES

State and federal health officials are investigating an outbreak of hepatitis A in Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico and Nevada. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday approximately 30 cases have been reported.  CDC says the cases are “potentially associated” with Townsend Farms Organic Antioxidant Blend frozen berries purchased from Costco.  Townsend Farms of Fairview, Oregon, referred calls to attorney Bill Garr. He didn’t immediately return a message.  A Costco spokesman in Issaquah, Washington, says the company has removed the product from stores and is contacting its members.  CDC, the federal Food and Drug Administration and state health departments are investigating.  CDC says hepatitis A is a liver disease ranging from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a severe one lasting several months.