NORTHWEST COLORADO NEWS FOR MONDAY, JUNE 3RD

CHARGES FILED AGAINST LESYSHEN

The 14th Judicial District Attorney’s Office has filed official charges against Lisa Marie Lesyshen of 1st Degree murder, domestic violence, and child abuse resulting in death.  That’s according to court documents, which also say Lesyshen shot her son 5 times at close range early Wednesday morning, before trying to get her estranged husband to kill her.  Michael Kirlan instead called authorities, who found Lesyshen with a self-inflicted gunshot wound when they arrived.  A 1st Degree murder conviction could result in the death penalty, but the D.A. hasn’t said whether that would be pursued.  Lesyshen is still hospitalized for now.  Memorial services for Asher Lesyshen-Kirlan will be held today at Howelson Hill.

 

FIREFIGHTERS EXTRICATE MAN FROM CAR FRIDAY WEST OF CRAIG

Craig firefighters had to extricate a man from his car Friday afternoon, after he rolled his car on highway 40 about 12 miles west of Craig.  Authorities suspect alcohol was a factor in the crash.  The New Mexico man, who wasn’t identified at the time of the crash, was taken to The Memorial Hospital at Craig for treatment of his injuries, which were considered to be serious.

 

4 PEOPLE HURT IN GRAND COUNTY ROLLOVER

Two people were seriously hurt, and two walked away with minor injuries after a spectacular car crash on Grand County Road 1 early yesterday morning. State troopers responded to the crash around 3 yesterday morning.  They say the driver of the car lost control, went off the road, and rolled numerous times down an embankment.  Two of the 4 occupants, John Murphy of Dillon and Daniel Terwilliger of Kremmling, were thrown from the car.  The other two, Robert Wisecup and Timberlea Felts of Kremmling, had to be extricated.  Terwilliger and Felts were airlifted to Denver Health Medical Center.  Wisecup and Murphy were treated for minor injuries at Middle Park Medical, and then released.  Troopers say alcohol and speed are both suspected factors in the crash.

 

BARKEY CHOSEN BY HICKENLOOPER TO SERVE ON STATE BOARD

14TH Judicial District Attorney Brett Barkey has been tapped by Governor John Hickenlooper to serve on the Colorado Coroners Standards and Training Board.  Hickenlooper announced numerous board and Commission appointments Friday.  The Colorado Coroners Standards and Training Board develops the curriculum for a 40-hour training course for new coroners; approves the qualifications of the instructors who teach the course; approves training providers to certify coroners in basic medical-legal death investigation; and approves training providers and programs for the annual sixteen-hour in-service training requirement.  Barkey’s term on the board runs through March 31st of next year.

 

EAGLE-NET AUDITED OVER MONEY MISMANAGEMENT

Independent auditors have found problems with the way an entity working to expand high-speed Internet service in Colorado manages its cash and allocates its costs.  Findings against the intergovernmental Eagle-Net Alliance were disclosed in a report submitted to the state auditor last week. The report also revealed the alliance has lost access to a $17 million revolving line of credit from UMB Bank after drawing just $500,000.  Eagle-Net won a $100.6 million federal grant in 2010 to improve broadband service for schools. But with less than $8 million remaining from its grant, it has connected fewer than half of the 168 school districts it aims to link to broadband.  The report says the alliance agrees with the findings and recommendations and has taken “corrective action.”  The Moffat County Commissioners have written letters to Senators Michael Bennet and Mark Udall, and Governor John Hickenlooper regarding their concern over EagleNet’s accountability.  Concerns include duplication of fiber already in the ground, and about $25 million that has gone missing from the program.

 

STEAMBOAT TO REMOVE DEAD TREES AT HOWELSON HILL

The City of Steamboat Springs has contracted with a local logger to remove about 25 mature Douglas-fir trees from the Howelsen Hill Ski Jump Complex.  The project began over the weekend, and follows the treatments started last spring. A forest health assessment conducted by the Colorado State Forest Service last week indicated that there are still trees on the hill infested by Douglas-fir beetles — close relatives of the mountain pine beetles that have affected millions of acres of lodgepole pine forest in Colorado. A combination of timely tree removal, pheromone deployment and continued monitoring is expected to help in the control and abatement of the Douglas-fir beetle problem in the forested area around the jumps.  Another significant reason for removing the trees is that, when dead, they represent a hazard to recreational users and the ski jumps themselves.  Trail closures will be necessary during the removal phase of the work and the city requests that all trail users respect the closures for safety reasons.  A crew will be working on site felling dead and infected trees during the week.

 

SERIES OF ANIMAL CROSSING POINTS PLANNED FOR HIGHWAY 9

Colorado Parks and Wildlife is asking hunters, anglers, skiers, outdoor recreationists and the general public to join the agency in support of the ‘Highway 9 Safety Project’. This Colorado Department of Transportation project includes the construction of wildlife overpasses and underpasses to help reduce vehicle/wildlife collisions on a 10.6-mile stretch of Highway 9 in Grand County, between Green Mountain Reservoir and the Colorado River near Kremmling.  According to CDOT, wildlife collisions in this area have led to nearly 600 vehicular accidents in the last 20 years, including 16 human fatalities and almost 200 injuries.  Thirty-five percent of the collisions were wildlife related. In addition, there have been nearly 450 animals killed – mostly mule deer – in the last eight years alone.  The plan calls for the construction of two overpasses and five underpasses designed specifically for wildlife and will be the first of its kind in Colorado.  They will allow animals to pass as motorists travel safely above or below.  Other improvements to the highway’s infrastructure include widening of the shoulders and improvements to sightlines.  Similar highway wildlife crossing have been built in other countries and throughout the United States, including Wyoming, Florida and California.

 

HEPATITIS A OUTBREAK LINKED TO BERRIES

State and federal health officials are investigating an outbreak of hepatitis A in Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico and Nevada. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday approximately 30 cases have been reported.  CDC says the cases are “potentially associated” with Townsend Farms Organic Antioxidant Blend frozen berries purchased from Costco.  Townsend Farms of Fairview, Oregon, referred calls to attorney Bill Garr. He didn’t immediately return a message.  A Costco spokesman in Issaquah, Washington, says the company has removed the product from stores and is contacting its members.  CDC, the federal Food and Drug Administration and state health departments are investigating.  CDC says hepatitis A is a liver disease ranging from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a severe one lasting several months.