NORTHWEST COLORADO NEWS FOR FRIDAY, JUNE 21ST

ROCK SLIDE FORCES TRAIL CLOSURE IN DINOSAUR NATIONAL MONUMENT

Due to an active rock slide affecting the Jones Hole Trail in Dinosaur National Monument, the adjacent creek, the trail and surrounding Parks lands, from the fish hatchery boundary to Ely Creek, are closed to the public until further notice.  The first reported rock slide occurred on Tuesday. A large slab of rock broke free from a cliff face just a short distance inside the monument boundary, less than ¼ mile from the Jones Hole Fish Hatchery. One fisherman reported having to run from a boulder that landed in the stream not too far from his location. After receiving reports, park rangers checked the scene and did not see any further activity.  On Thursday morning, another small slide occurred. Then at around noon, a much larger slab of rock broke free and fell into the stream below. A large debris field formed below the slide site. The slide was large enough to send large boulders, the size of a pickup truck, across Jones Hole Creek before coming to rest against trees by the hiking trail. The surrounding area is covered with a layer of dust from the slide. No injuries were reported as a result of the slide.  The Jones Hole Trail is a popular hiking trail that connects the Jones Hole Fish Hatchery with the Green River.

 

MOFFAT COUNTY COMMISSIONER CHUCK GROBE TESTIFIES BEFORE WASHINGTON COMMITTEE

Yesterday, Moffat County Commissioner Chuck Grobe testified before a Senate subcommittee headed by Congressman Scott Tipton on the importance of energy development in America.  Grobe provided testimony on how federal regulations are impeding growth of the industry and the communities that host exploration and drilling projects.  The discussion touched on the effects of such regulation on businesses, tourism, wildlife, recreation and hunting, among other aspects.  Tipton says Grobe did a good job of presenting Moffat County’s case, but he’s not entirely sure the message is getting across to everyone.  He says most Republicans are attentive to the concerns, while most democrats are simply interested in enforcing Washington policy.

 

COLLINS FIRE STARTED BY LIGHTNING

The 50 acre Collins Fire is a lightning caused blaze that was reported yesterday afternoon to the Craig Interagency Fire Center. It is burning in pinion and juniper trees on Bureau of Land Management land about 17 miles southwest of Meeker, in the Piceance Basin.  There are four engines, one 20-person hand crew and one helicopter assigned with air tankers and additional hand crews on order.  Structures in the area include one primary residence a mile and a half south of the fire and electric power lines. The fire is moving north and northeast away from the residence.

 

WILD ROSE FIRE REMAPPED AT 1,000 ACRES

Reports from the Wild Rose Fire indicated that it was holding close to 1,000 acres. There was no substantial growth; the additional acres are due to better mapping. The three assigned hot shot crews have made good progress constructing fire lines with air support from a large air tanker dropping retardant and water drops from helicopters.  Winds were gusting up to 30 miles per hour and the Red Flag Warning is still in effect for critical fire weather today and tomorrow.  The Rocky Mountain Type 2 Incident Management Team will assume command of the Wild Rose Fire tomorrow.  The first priority is public and fire fighter safety while holding the fire from spreading north and east.  Due to the fire Rio Blanco County Road 116 is closed from Highway 139 to County Road 113; and County Road 107 is closed from Highway 139 to County Road 116.

 

RED CROSS FUNDRAISER PULLS IN OVER $135,000

In just three hours, Colorado radio and television stations joined forces to raise a total of $135,567 for the American Red Cross in support of Red Cross efforts to prepare for, respond to and help people recover from wildfires in Colorado.  KRAI and 55 Country were a part of the statewide event.  The fundraiser was made possible with the help of nearly 50 volunteers who answered phones and tallied donations.

 

RESIDENTS ASKED TO BE AWARE OF TRAFFIC CHANGES IN STEAMBOAT

Residents and visitors in Steamboat can expect to see some changes to Yampa Street beginning in the next few weeks. As discussed in the June 18th City Council Meeting the speed limit along the street will be reduced to 15mph for the entire stretch of Yampa Street. This is intended to acknowledge the nature of use along the street, as every summer more pedestrians and bicycles are using it. There will also be some rearrangement of parking in order to provide a path for pedestrians to access the walking areas along the riverside of the street.  Businesses along Yampa Street are asked to please avoid placing obstacles or parking vehicles in driveways that block the walking areas on the riverside of Yampa Street and force pedestrians out in the street.  The City is also expanding their partnership with the Colorado Department of Transportation Bicycle and Pedestrian Program. In 2010, CDOT funded and installed a permanent bicycle counter on Elk River Road, near the intersection with US40. On June 20th, a consultant for CDOT will install a second permanent bicycle counter across Yampa Street between 7th and 8th Streets.  The counters will generate information relative to bicycle usage in these two areas and provide the City and CDOT with necessary information to assess infrastructure needs and trends over time.

 

GOOD TURN-OUT FOR BAND, BARBECUE AND MOVIE

About 250 people showed up to take advantage of a free barbecue and watch the 101st Army Dixieland Band play at Craig City Park last night.  The barbecue was provided by KRAI, 55 Country, and the Craig Daily Press.  After the concert, those in the park were treated to an outdoor movie on a big screen by the City of Craig.  The showing of “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” was also a fund raiser for Grand Futures of Moffat County.  While the movie was free, Grand Futures sold popcorn and soda.

 

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