NORTHWEST COLORADO NEWS AND SPORTS FOR WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5TH

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MOFFAT COUNTY COMMISSIONERS CONSIDER FATE OF LUTTRELL BARN

The Moffat County Commissioners are trying to figure out what to do with the aging Luttrell Barn.  The barn, on the east side of Craig, has been used for reserved gatherings in the community, but is only used during the summer months.  The commissioners say even in the summer, the barn gets minimal use.  The building is in need of renovations if it will continue to be used.  While the commissioners have budgeted $100,000 for those renovations, Director of Developmental Services, Roy Mason, says it will take more than twice that to do it right.  The commissioners requested a poll last week to see what the community would like done with the building.  The three options being considered were “tear it down”, “renovate it”, or “relocate it”.  Nobody seemed to want it torn down, so the commissioners are leaning toward moving the building.  They’ve already initiated conversations with Lou Wyman about moving it to the Living History Museum.  Due to the anticipated cost of renovations, the commissioners will continue those talks with Wyman.

 

CITIZEN UPSET ABOUT TREATMENT DURING FIRE TOWER DISCUSSION

A concerned citizen has written a lengthy letter to the Craig City Council, the Craig Fire Board, and any concerned citizen, chastising local government leaders for pushing through the fire board’s request for a $1.5 million training tower.  Al Cashion, an insurance agent in Craig, was involved in many meetings designed to explore the possibility.  Cashion says while the money being used for the tower was not intended to pay for the construction of any new structures, it was the Fire Board’s attitude that gave him hesitation.  In the letter, he accuses board members of alienating the community, by pushing through with a purchase the community is against, and scolded the Craig City Council for allowing it to go through.  Cashion also questions the need for the tower, noting the existence of a tower in Hayden that is available for training.  He says both entities have been condescending and insulting to those who have opposed the project, and singles each of the council members out.  Mayor Terry Carwile says while Cashion makes some good points about the facts of the project, he says Cashion’s beef is really with the Fire Board.  He says the council’s boards and commissions are responsible for researching the legalities and feasibility of certain projects, and then make their recommendations to the council.  He says this project came back with a unanimous recommendation.  While Cashion maintains the issue should go to a vote of the people, Fire Board President Byron Willems says people elect the board to make those tough decisions.  He says they are trying to plan for the future with the 5 story tower, as the Craig City Council has recently raised the maximum height limit on buildings from 3 stories to 5 stories.  Willems says he is also willing to discuss the issue with anyone who has questions.

 

BLM EXTENDS IT’S DEADLINE FOR WILD HORSE SANCTUARY PROPOSALS

The Bureau of Land Management says it is extending its deadline for private land wild horse ecosanctuary proposals to September 19.  The ecosanctuaries, to be publicly accessible with a potential for ecotourism, would help the BLM feed and care for excess wild horses that have been removed from Western public rangelands. Each proposed ecosanctuary must be able to support at least 100 wild horses.  For more information, please contact Susan Kaller, Grants Management Officer, at 775-861-6559 or Zachary Reichold, Senior Wild Horse and Burro Specialist, at 202-912-7261.

 

SECRETARY OF STATE SEEKS BIG VOTER REGISTRATION NUMBERS

Election officials are sending mailers encouraging people to register to vote and launching educational ads in what Secretary of State Scott Gessler says is the largest voter registration drive in state history.  Gessler said yesterday the mailers will reach about 961,000 people who are likely eligible to vote but aren’t registered. Television and radio advertisements, which can be heard on KRAI-FM and 55 Country, will also encourage people to register.  Gessler, a Republican, has faced criticism recently for his sending letters to nearly 4,000 registered voters questioning their citizenship. He says he plans move forward with a rule to hold hearings to challenge voter registration when citizenship is in doubt.  He maintains he’s committed to ensuring people’s right to vote and that the voter registration drive had been in the works for months.

 

FOREST VISITORS WARNED ABOUT LOGGING EFFORTS

Forest visitors traveling on the Hog Park Road may encounter delays this month as a result of hazard tree clearing.  Work will affect both sides of the road for about half a mile, while a private land owner works to remove hazard trees from the section of road that runs through their property. The work area is north of the Green Mountain Falls Trailhead at the North Fork of the Encampment River crossing.  Work will be conducted Tuesdays through Thursdays with no impacts on the weekends. The road will not be closed while work is being completed, however delays up to 30 minutes may be possible. Motorists should be aware of safety signing and flaggers directing them to stop and wait while trees are felled or loaded.  Also, logging equipment may be operating close to the road. Visitors should be aware of log trucks on Forest Road 550 and Highway 70.

 

CANDIDATE DENIED NAME ON COLORADO BALLOT

A naturalized citizen who wanted to run for president despite not being American-born has lost his bid to get on the ballot in Colorado.  Abdul Karim Hassan of New York state contends the Constitution’s requirement that presidential candidates be U.S.-born violates equal-protection rights under the Fourteenth Amendment.  A magistrate judge had ruled the amendment didn’t affect the validity of the Constitution’s distinction between natural-born citizens and naturalized citizens. Hassan appealed, saying that even if he can’t assume the office of president, Colorado election officials discriminated against him by blocking him from appearing on the ballot.  A panel of the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals yesterday backed the judge, who found the state has a legitimate interest in leaving him off the ballot if he can’t assume the office.

 

 

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