NORTHWEST COLORADO NEWS AND SPORTS FOR WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6TH

STATE LAWMAKERS WADE THROUGH GUN CONTROL MEASURES

Colorado Democrats have proposed a slate of gun-control measures – but they won’t be suggesting a full ban on assault weapons.  The package outlined yesterday calls for universal background checks for gun purchases, plus a new ban on high-capacity magazines.  Democrats stopped short of suggesting a statewide ban on assault weapons. Instead they suggest new liability standards for the users and sellers of such guns.  The Democrats also want to see new requirements for mental health professionals telling authorities about patients who shouldn’t have access to guns.  A Colorado woman who lost her sister in the Sandy Hook shooting says she thought that these new laws would help prevent similiar tragedies.  Republicans are expected to oppose the ideas. The Democratic Legislature has already rejected several GOP ideas to reduce gun violence, including a bill to allow school employees to carry concealed weapons.  The pro-gun side is hoping Governor Hickenlooper will put the brakes on some of these ideas.

 

CRAIG POLICE WARN OF ANOTHER PHONE SCAM

The Craig Police Department is warning of another scam that seems to have hit the community.  The department was contacted by a citizen about a suspicious phone call they received.  The person did not speak clear English and asked for the resident by name, even confirming the address.  The caller told the victim that they would be getting a new Medicare card, and that all Medicare clients would be getting new cards.  However, that was when the caller started asking them to confirm bank account information.  The resident did right, by hanging up on the caller, but police want to make sure others know to do that as well.  Police remind residents that no government program will contact citizens by phone and ask for personal identification, like bank account info, social security number, or other personal information.  You should NEVER give that information out to an unknown person over the phone.

 

MARIJUANA TASK FORCE CAN’T AGREE ON WHO CAN GROW

Colorado marijuana regulators can’t decide whether future pot sellers should be required to grow most of the weed they sell.  A task force set up to consider regulating Colorado’s new legal marijuana law was divided on the question yesterday. Task force members couldn’t agree whether future pot shops should look like liquor stores, which don’t produce the booze they sell. Colorado’s existing medical marijuana industry requires sellers to grow the majority of their product, a requirement aimed at preventing pot from ending up on the black market.  The so-called “integration” question is a big one for Colorado’s marijuana regulators because it will determine how pot is grown and sold. The task force yesterday put off the question but still plans make a decision by the end of the month.

 

R.O.E.M. FOCUSES ON SCALDING BURNS DURING BURN AWARENESS WEEK

This week is National Burn Awareness Week, and the Routt County Office of Emergency Management is pushing awareness of scalding burns.  The office says while thousands of scald burns occur annually, increased awareness is the key to preventing them.  They emphasize that scalding burns can occur from tap water as well as cooking, and even say tap water burns are usually more severe than cooking burns.  The office is providing information on how to prevent and treat scald burns.  The tips can be found by clicking on the link below.

Media Release – National Burn Awareness Week – February 3-9, 2013 – 02-05-2013

 

AUTOMATED CAR BILL DIES IN SENATE COMMITTEE

Automated cars won’t be allowed in Colorado this year after a state Senate committee rejected a bill to allow driverless vehicles.  The Senate Transportation Committee decided against the bill to make Colorado at least the fifth state where automatic cars are legal. The cars are under development and are touted as safer than human-operated vehicles.  The bill would have stated that automated cars must still contain licensed drivers, and that the cars would have to have an override switch so they can be driven manually if needed.

 

LAWMAKERS FORM SMALL BUSINESS CAUCUS

Yesterday, Representatives Scott Tipton of Colorado and Chellie Pingree of Maine announced the formation of a bipartisan caucus committed to open dialogue on the issues that most impact small businesses. Members of the Congressional Small Business Caucus are dedicated to advancing efforts to foster the economic certainty needed for small businesses and entrepreneurs to succeed and create jobs.  The primary goals of the Caucus include raising awareness of issues that most impact small businesses including access to capital, access to technology, regulation and taxation, and exploring legislative solutions to encourage entrepreneurship and small business growth; providing a forum for candid conversation with small business owners to gather recommendations on what issues and priorities Congress should focus on to assist small businesses; advancing and promoting small business initiatives that support local commerce and strengthen communities; and providing information and education to help Members of Congress arrange job fairs, business roundtables, trade expos and other events in their districts that promote small business growth and encourage job creation.

 

STATE OFFICIALS UPSET WITH S&P RATING

Colorado has filed a lawsuit alleging that Standard & Poor’s inflated its ratings on risky mortgage investments that helped trigger the 2008 financial crisis.  Attorney General John Suthers alleged yesterday that the credit rating agency put its financial interests above its self-described objectivity. The Denver District Court suit seeks unspecified civil penalties and damages.  The U.S. government filed a civil suit against S&P in federal court yesterday. It claimed the agency gave high marks to mortgage-backed securities because it wanted to earn more business from the banks that issued the investments.  The federal government is seeking at least $5 billion in penalties. S&P says the lawsuit is without merit.  At least 12 other states filed lawsuits against Standard & Poor’s yesterday.

 

FOREST GRAZING FEES REMAIN UNCHANGED FOR 2013

The federal grazing fee for 2013 will be $1.35 per head month (HM) for lands managed by the U.S. Forest Service and $1.35 per animal unit month (AUM) for public lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management. The grazing fee for 2013 is the same as it was in 2012.  An HM or AUM – treated as equivalent measures for fee purposes – is the occupancy and use of public lands by one cow and her calf, one horse, or five sheep or goats for a month. The newly calculated grazing fee, determined by a congressional formula and effective on March 1, applies to more than 8,000 permits administered by the Forest Service and nearly 18,000 grazing permits and leases administered by BLM.  The formula used for calculating the grazing fee, which was established by Congress in the 1978 Public Rangelands Improvement Act, has continued under a presidential Executive Order issued in 1986. Under that order, the grazing fee cannot fall below $1.35 per AUM, and any increase or decrease cannot exceed 25 percent of the previous year’s level.

In high school sports:
Tomorrow:

In basketball:
Little Snake River Valley is home against Saratoga.

In wrestling:
Hayden hosts a triangular with Soroco and Steamboat attending.

In alpine skiing:
Steamboat goes to Loveland.