NORTHWEST COLORADO NEWS AND SPORTS FOR WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10TH

MOFFAT COUNTY COMMISSIONERS TESTIFY AGAINST SB13-252

On Monday, all three Moffat County Commissioners traveled to Denver to testify against Senate Bill 13-252…and they weren’t alone.  Several officials from various counties testified that the bill was not only extremely inconvenient for rural areas, but that it was impossible to implement.  The bill requires Tri-State Generation and Transmission in Craig to generate 25% of it’s electricity using renewable sources by the year 2020.  Not only is the plan cost prohibitive, but the plant already has its energy provider contracts locked up through 2020.  The commissioners said there were over 50 people that testified against the bill.  They said while there was one person representing environmental concerns, the rest of those that testified for the bill were those that make their money in the renewable energy sector.  The commissioners said the only lawmakers that asked questions, were the two republicans on the committee.  There were three democrats, one of which was rarely in the room, and one of which only seemed interested in her laptop computer.  The bill was drafted and sponsored by John Morse and Gayle Scwartz.  Interestingly enough, they exempted each of their districts.  Even after all of the testimony against the bill, it was quickly passed on a 3 to 2 vote along party lines.  The Denver Post is even critical of the legislation, publishing an editorial today that says the sponsors should either lower the required percentage, or give power plants more time to comply.  The commissioners were obviously frustrated with the process, and at one time during yesterday’s commissioners’ meeting Tom Mathers said he felt like it was a wasted trip.  However, Sheriff Tim jantz and members of the audience expressed their appreciation for the attempt to halt the legislation, and encouraged them to continue the fight.  Senate Bill 13-252 could be on the governor’s desk by next week.

 

SHERIFFS COMBINING EFFORTS TO FIGHT NEW GUN LAWS

Sheriffs in Colorado are standing against the state’s new gun laws.  Over half of the state’s sheriff’s have gathered to consider a lawsuit to prevent the laws from being enacted.  The sheriffs contend the new magazine and transfer laws specifically are unenforceable.  Moffat County Sheriff Tim Jantz is one of those.  He talked about the lawsuit at yesterday’s Moffat County Commissioners meeting, and said he won’t give up fighting against the attack on 2nd amendment rights.  37 sheriff’s have agreed to join the suit at this point, and more may join.  The sheriff’s will launch the suit themselves, without participation from the County Sheriffs of Colorado, the group that represents the state’s sheriffs.

 

CAR ACCIDENT SENDS ONE TO HOSPITAL WITH MINOR INJURIES

Yesterday’s snow storm caused a couple of accidents in the Craig area that sent a total of 4 people to the hospital.  The first was a minor accident that involved one car hitting the back of another at the intersection of Finley Lane and Victory Way.  One person was taken to The Memorial Hospital at Craig for treatment of minor injuries.  The second accident happened 10 miles west of Craig.  Reports say a vehicle lost control on the slick surface of Highway 40 and rolled over on the side of the road.  Three Utah residents from that accident were taken to The Memorial Hospital, again for minor injuries.

 

CURLING LEAGUE COULD BE COMING TO CRAIG

Moffat County residents could soon see another sport in the area.  Moffat County Commissioner Chuck Grobe went to Aspen recently to see how feasible it would be to create a curling league.  The county has been trying to come up with more ways to get use out of the Loudy Simpson Ice Arena, and has discovered that curling is a sport that can involve a wide variety of participants.  Grobe says the sport is accessible to everyone, including the handicapped and the elderly.  He also says it could be set up without too much disruption to the hockey set-up.  Grobe says over 80 people have expressed interest in a curling league.  The commissioners will continue to look into the idea.

 

HOUSE DEMOCRATS APPROVE OIL AND GAS RULES

Colorado House Democrats have passed new restrictions on the state’s powerful oil and gas regulators.  The House voted 34-29 yesterday to require and stricter standards for recusal on conflicts of interest. Two Democrats and all Republicans opposed the bill.  The bill originally banned current oil and gas workers from membership on the Colorado Oil & Gas Conservation Commission, but Democratic sponsors ratcheted back the ban.  The revised bill makes an important policy statement to regulators – that public safety is more important than extracting all possible oil and gas resources. That language raised hackles from Republicans, who argued that Democrats want to hurt property rights.  The Senate now will consider the proposal.

 

STEAMBOAT TEEN COUNCIL NAMES TEEN OF THE MONTH

The Steamboat Springs Teen Council has selected Nissa Parker as the Teen of the Month for April. The Council says Parker has been chosen because she is an outstanding teen and embodies critical values of Teen Council, including demonstrating that teens are valuable community assets, acting as a leader and/or a positive role model amongst peers, and being committed to community service. Parker is a senior at the Lowell Whiteman School and is active in her school and community. She is a member of the National Honor Society and recently organized the school’s talent show. She is a member of the Steamboat Springs Dance Theater and plays the cello in the Steamboat Springs Youth Orchestra Ensemble. Parker also works at Elevation Dance Studio and is active with her church. She has been on the honors list at school every trimester since her freshman year. Parker will be awarded with a $25 Chamber Gift Certificate and will be featured on the City of Steamboat Springs City Page.

 

C-U RAISES TUITION RATES

University of Colorado regents have approved a new tuition model that effectively raises in-state tuition by 8.7 percent on the campus in Boulder.  Regents voted 6-3 yesterday to approve the new model, raising tuition for students in the College of Arts and Sciences to $8,760.  Under the new model, full-time students would be charged $365 per credit hour for 12 credit hours. Currently, full-time students pay $358 per credit hour for 11.25 credit hours per semester, though they can take several more credits.  Regents approved a 1.9 percent increase for first-year undergraduates from out-of-state on the Boulder campus, raising the incoming rate to $30,538.  They also approved a 3.1 percent increase in a merit-based compensation pool for faculty, plus 6 percent tuition hikes at CU’s Denver and Colorado Springs campuses.

In high school sports:
Yesterday:

In baseball:
Steamboat lost to Delta (21-7).

Tomorrow:
In girls soccer:
Steamboat is on the road to Glenwood at 6.
Moffat County goes to Basalt at 4.
Rangely heads to Coal Ridge at 4.