NORTHWEST COLORADO NEWS AND SPORTS FOR TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2ND

U.S. SUPREME COURT UPHOLDS ROADLESS RULING

The U.S. Supreme Court has turned away an appeal challenging a federal rule that bars development on 50 million acres of roadless areas in national forests.  The justices ruled yesterday they will leave in place a federal appeals court decision that upheld the so-called roadless rule that took effect late in the presidency of Bill Clinton.  The state of Wyoming and the Colorado Mining Association said closing so much forest land to development has had serious consequences for residents of Western states and the logging, mining and drilling industries.  Supporters of the rule said the nation’s forests need protection from development to preserve pristine areas that provide wildlife and natural resource habitat for hunting, fishing and recreation.  The roadless rule enacted under Clinton in 2001 had been upheld earlier by both the Denver-based 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and the San Francisco-based 9th U.S. Circuit in separate cases.

 

STEAMBOAT WATER RESTRICTIONS ARE LIFTED

After thirteen weeks of Mandatory Stage 2 Water Restrictions, the water providers in the Steamboat area – the City of Steamboat, the Mount Werner Water District, the Steamboat 2 Metro District, and the Tree Haus Metro District – announced yesterday that they are lifting the mandatory water restrictions enacted at the end of June.  Summer water usage data indicates that, under the restrictions, the community continued to reduce its daily water use through the summer months.  Water managers say the community’s cooperation was appreciated, and due to the conservation efforts, they were able to reduce usage by about 15%.  Rebates for water-efficient replacement toilets, dishwashers, and clothes washers are still available for residents by calling the Mt. Werner Water office at 879-2424.

 

INTERFAITH FOOD BANK NEEDS COMMUNITY HELP TO RESTOCK

The Interfaith Food Bank of Craig is seriously depleted.  Food bank workers say they have received a higher than usual demand for food in the community lately, and are now looking to restock for the winter and upcoming holidays.  Volunteer Barbara Baker said yesterday her shelves are “literally empty”.  She went on to say that in all the years working there she has “never seen it this low.”  A food drive is being conducted at all 4 of Craig’s banks until Friday.  Interfaith Food Bank reps say they need to raise a lot of food during the drive, if they’re going to be able to keep up with the needs of the community.  If you’d like to make a cash or food donation, you can do it at any of Craig’s banks.  You’ll find a list of needed items on the events page.

 

DEER COLLISIONS CAN COST DRIVERS THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS

Collisions between automobiles and deer are responsible for about 150 fatalities and $1.1 billion in property damage every year in the U.S. In fall and winter, when the animals mate, they pay less attention to traffic. The average cost per insurance claim for collision damage is $2,800, with costs varying depending on the type of vehicle and severity of damage. When you factor in auto claims involving bodily injury, the average rises to $10,000.  Not all animal collisions involve automobiles.  In fact, a skate boarder traveling at 40 mph near Denver ended up in the hospital recently, following a collision with a deer. The encounter was captured on helmet cam by a fellow skate boarder. You’ll find that video and a list of defensive driving tips to avoid hitting deer below.

Defensive driving tips to avoid hitting a deer.

  • Be especially attentive from sunset to midnight and during the hours shortly before and after sunrise. These are the highest risk times for deer-vehicle collisions.
  • Drive with caution when moving through deer-crossing zones, in areas known to have a large deer population and in areas where roads divide agricultural fields from forestland. Deer seldom run alone. If you see one deer, others may be nearby.
  • When driving at night, use high beam headlights when there is no oncoming traffic. The high beams will better illuminate the eyes of deer on or near the roadway.
  • Slow down and blow your horn with one long blast to frighten the deer away.
  • Brake firmly when you notice a deer in or near your path, but stay in your lane. Many serious crashes occur when drivers swerve to avoid a deer and hit another vehicle or lose control of their cars.
  • Always wear your seat belt. Most people injured in car/deer crashes were not wearing their seat belt.
  • Do not rely on devices such as deer whistles, deer fences and reflectors to deter deer. These devices have not been proven to reduce deer-vehicle collisions.

 

ROMNEY HOLDS RALLY LEADING UP TO DENVER DEBATE

Mitt Romney is touting the support of a pair of Colorado sports icons as he tries to win the pivotal battleground state of Colorado.  The Republican presidential candidate was introduced by John Elway at a rally last night in Denver. Colorado Rockies first baseman Todd Helton was also in the crowd.  Romney and President Barack Obama will meet for their first debate at the University of Denver tomorrow. Analysts believe it’s a make-or-break moment for Romney after a rough September.  Romney said the debate will let him lay out his vision to voters.  As the debate nears, you can voice your opinion on which candidate would better suit Northwest Colorado by answering the survey question posted on the front page.

 

PARKS AND WILDLIFE TO DISCUSS MOOSE RELOCATION PROGRAM

Colorado Parks and Wildlife is inviting western Colorado residents to a public presentation and discussion about the state of the Grand Mesa moose population, and the current status of the relocation project that brought them here.  Based on the latest moose population estimates, wildlife managers say that the relocation project can be considered a great success.  Funded almost entirely by the sale of hunting and fishing licenses, wildlife managers began relocating Shiras moose from Utah and other areas of Colorado in early 2005.  Wildlife managers relocated 91 moose to the area before the transplant phase concluded in 2007.  During the evening presentation and discussion, Duckett and other wildlife managers will offer interesting information about moose, including a brief history of the species in Colorado, viewing tips and the agency’s plans to maintain a healthy population.

Who: Colorado Parks and Wildlife

What: “State of the Moose” public presentation

When: Wednesday, Oct. 10, 6 p.m.

Where: Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s Northwest Region Office – 711 Independent Ave., Grand Junction

 

SURVEY SHOWS LATINOS ARE MORE CONCERNED ABOUT EDUCATION THAN IMMIGRATION LAWS

A new survey shows Latino voters are more interested in the education of their children than immigration laws.  The Colorado Latino Leadership survey says the 582 residents surveyed indicated education was their top priority when it comes to this year’s election.  The economy and health care came next, with immigration laws being 4th on the list.  The group says it shows that Americans, no matter their ethnic background, have similar concerns across the nation.  However, the survey was focused mostly on Denver democrats, with a scattered few coming from other areas of the state.

In high school sports:
Today:

In volleyball:
Moffat County hosts Grand Valley at 6.
Steamboat is home against Battle Mountain at 6:30.
Soroco goes to Vail Christian at 4.

In boys golf:
Steamboat continues at Cobble Creek Golf Course in Montrose.

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