NORTHWEST COLORADO NEWS AND SPORTS FOR TUESDAY, APRIL 9TH

SPRING STORM COULD CAUSE PROBLEMS FOR TRAVELERS

Officials are cautioning travelers that a spring storm making its way across the Rocky Mountain and Great Plains region will bring periods of freezing rain, heavy snowfall, and extremely high winds through tomorrow.  The National Weather Service has predicted winter storm conditions of varying intensity throughout the six-state region that includes Colorado, Utah and Wyoming. Driving conditions are expected to be difficult, with heavy, wet snow and high winds. People who must travel in affected areas are advised to slow down and drive with extreme caution, and those who are staying home are also urged to make plans for the possible loss of power.  Those traveling are also urged to have an emergency supply kit in the trunk of their car. FEMA urges families to maintain an emergency supply kit both at home and in the car to help prepare for winter power outages and icy or impassable roads.  For a list of safety tips click here.

 

WEATHER DELAYS FOOD PANTRY VISIT TO CRAIG

The spring storm that has settled on Northwest Colorado is affecting food delivery from the Mobile Food Pantry.  The Mobile Food Pantry was scheduled to make a stop in Craig today, but weather conditions have forced the pantry to delay its visit.  The pantry provides food to people in need, and has had a big response since it started stopping in Craig.  Those that were expecting to pick up food today, will have to wait until next week.  The Pantry will stop at the Boys and Girls Club of Craig April 16th from 11:30 to 1:30.

 

STEAMBOAT SEMINAR TO FOCUS ON GUN RIGHTS FOR WOMEN

A seminar on gun rights will be held tonight in Steamboat, featuring attorney Gayle Trotter.  “A Woman’s Right to Choose Self Protection” is a look at gun owner’s rights from a female perspective.  Trotter also stopped by last night’s Town Hall Meeting in Steamboat, led by Routt County Sheriff Garrett Wiggins.  At that meeting, gun shop owners expressed their concerns with the state’s new gun control laws.  Their primary concern was conducting background checks for private transfers.  The shop owners say that could cause legal problems.  Trotter’s seminar will be held tonight at the Ranch at Steamboat from 5:30 to 7:30.  Students under the age of 30 get in free.  For all others the cost is $10.

 

POT SHOPS MAY NOT HAVE TO GROW THEIR OWN

Future recreational pot shops in Colorado have won a measure of flexibility. A legislative panel voted yesterday to reject a plan to require marijuana shops to grow most of the weed they sell.  The vote came on the final day for the House-Senate committee assembled to regulate pot.  The committee decided that future recreational marijuana shops should be like liquor stores, which don’t have to make the products they sell. Some wanted marijuana shops to act like current medical marijuana dispensaries, which are required to grow 70 percent of the marijuana they sell.  The debate has big consequences for Colorado’s marijuana industry. If approved by the full Legislature, the proposal would allow people to specialize in just one aspect of the pot business, growing or distributing or retailing.

 

HEALTH EXCHANGE DEBATE CANCELLED DUE TO LACK OF SUPPORT

A senate floor debate scheduled for today on establishing a state health exchange has been scrapped, and may not be scheduled again this year.  That’s according to the bill’s sponsor, democratic Senator Irene Aguilar of Denver.  She says if she can’t get the necessary votes to pass the bill, she won’t allow it to be debated.  The measure would create a $16 billion plan to centralize health coverage for the state.  Republicans call the plan socialism, and say it would impose an unfair tax burden on the people of Colorado.  Because Aguilar would need all Democrats and at least 4 Republicans to vote for the bill, it is considered a lost cause.  Aguilar, in the meantime, is putting together a new bill that would establish a committee to study ideas for a new healthcare system.

 

PLAN FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGES TO OFFER 4-YEAR DEGREES DIES

The state’s community colleges will NOT be able to offer 4-year degrees after all.  The House Education Committee killed a plan yesterday that would have allowed the state’s community colleges to grant 4-year degrees in seven need-based fields of study, such as dentistry and mortuary science.  The idea was to provide a less expensive way of achieving a 4-year degree, especially for rural students.  The state’s universities were the primary objectors.  They want more discussion about what it would mean for their schools, and how they would be involved in the process.  The bill died on a 7-6 vote yesterday.

 

DEMOCRATS ATTEMPTING MAJOR CHANGES IN VOTING PROCEDURES

Colorado Democrats are planning sweeping changes to how elections are run in the state. Democrats want to allow same-day voter registration and to require that every registered voter gets a ballot by mail.  A bill more than 100 pages long is expected to be introduced this week. It has already drawn the ire of Republicans who say the changes are aimed at helping Democrats win.  Republican Secretary of State Scott Gessler, who oversees elections, says he wasn’t consulted. State Republican Party Chairman Ryan Call says he’s concerned about potential voter fraud that will benefit Democrats.  Supporters of the bill say the goal is to make voting accessible to more people, and that the worries about voter fraud are unfounded.  Democrats control the Legislature after two years of split-party rule.

In high school sports:
Yesterday:

In boys lacrosse:
Steamboat beat Fruita Monument (12-1).

Today:
In baseball:
Steamboat goes to Delta for a double header, with the first game starting at 4.

In girls soccer:
Steamboat travels to Battle Mountain for a game at 6.
Rangely hosts Aspen at 4.

In girls lacrosse:
Steamboat goes to Summit at 4.