NORTHWEST COLORADO NEWS AND SPORTS FOR MONDAY, MAY 6TH

Control Burn Loses Control

Gusty winds sent a control burn out of control for a short time this afternoon.  The burn which was started for ditch maintenance along Highway 40 about 4 miles east of Craig, got out of hand when gusty winds began to spread the fire near the Wyman Living History Museum.  The Craig fire Department responded and brought the fire under control within an hour.  No property was damaged during the incident.

 

GRASS FIRE PUT OUT ON SOUTH RANNEY SATURDAY

The Craig Fire Department took about an hour and a half to extinguish a grass fire on South Ranney Saturday afternoon. The fire, just south of the Yampa River Bridge along the east side of the road, burned less than an acre and no property was damaged. The cause of the fire remains undetermined.

 

AG DEPARTMENT TO HOLD TOWN HALL MEETING IN CRAIG

The Colorado Department of Agriculture invites the public to attend a town hall meeting in Craig this week focusing on meat processing and inspections. Topics include the inspection process, facility requirements, custom exempt processing facility requirements, and marketing opportunities and assistance. The idea is to find out more about the needs of producers and meat processors and how the department can assist in developing new marketing opportunities. The meeting is open to the public, free of charge, and everyone is invited to participate. The meeting will be Thursday at 3 in the Conference room of the Moffat County Courthouse. For more information, click here.

 

CNCC COMMENCEMENT TO TAKE PLACE SATURDAY

Colorado Northwestern Community College is preparing for its commencement this weekend. A few activities will lead up to the commencement, including a Nurse pinning ceremony in Craig, and ceremonies in Rangely for the Aviation Technology and Dentistry Departments. The President’s Luncheon takes place at noon Saturday at the Johnson Dining Hall on the Rangely campus. Commencement takes place at 2 that afternoon, with Jean White as the keynote speaker.

 

PARKS AND WILDLIFE TO FINALIZE HUNTING LICENSE NUMBERS

The Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission will finalize 2013 big-game hunting license numbers when it travels to Grand Junction for its May meeting on Thursday.  In addition, the Commission will consider an emergency regulation to protect a population of stocked tiger muskies in Harvey Gap Reservoir north of Rifle.  Fishery managers plan to introduce a number of 22-to-24-inch tiger muskies into Harvey Gap to assist in balancing the northern pike population. As sterile fish, tiger muskies are also expected to grow rapidly and create fishing opportunity in the future. However, unlike northern pike, tiger muskies can’t reproduce so they pose less risk to endangered fish populations in the Upper Colorado River basin. To protect the newly introduced fish, methods that target larger fish such as spearfishing, archery fishing and gigging will be suspended at Harvey Gap if the measure is approved.  The Commission will also include staff presentations regarding proposed changes for the 2013-2014 migratory bird hunting seasons, proposed changes to the regulations for sanctuaries and commercial wildlife parks, as well as standard monthly updates on financial, legal and regional issues.  The meeting will be held at the Doubletree Hotel in Grand Junction, beginning at 8:30. A full agenda and meeting details can be seen by clicking here.

 

POLLS SHOW MOST AMERICANS WANT MORE OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION

Western Energy Alliance has publicly released the findings of a national telephone survey of 1,000 high-performing voters evaluating public opinion about domestic oil and natural gas production and the industry practice of hydraulic fracturing. The results confirm voters nationwide support increased domestic energy development and recognize the economic benefits energy brings to the overall economy. Among the key findings, 87% of voters surveyed want domestic production to meet the growing demand for additional sources of energy and more than 78% of voters favor increased development of oil and natural gas in the United States, with 63% strongly favoring. Only 17% of voters oppose the increased development of oil and natural gas. Western Energy Alliance will carry this message to Washington D.C. next week along with 65 industry representatives, ranchers, county commissioners, state legislators, regulators, and others aimed at educating Congress and federal policymakers on the enormous economic and energy potential of the West.

 

PARKS AND WILDLIFE SAY LEAVE BABY ANIMALS ALONE

Despite the wintry weather in many parts of the state, spring is here, and with it comes the arrival of baby birds and mammals to Colorado. Colorado Parks and Wildlife is reminding citizens that newborn wildlife may be found in their yards, along trails, or in open spaces, and the best advice is to leave them alone. Each year, Parks and Wildlife receives scores of calls from concerned people about wildlife that appear to have been abandoned by adult animals. Many are tempted to “help” a young animal by picking it up or trying to feed it, however it is critical that people understand there is no substitute for their natural parents. Wildlife experts agree that it is quite normal for adult animals to leave their young in a safe place while they go forage for food. And often baby birds are learning to fly or fledging, near their nests when they are deemed abandoned. While well-meaning people sometimes gather up this baby wildlife and bring them to wildlife rehabilitation facilities, it is often the wrong thing to do. Wildlife officials say baby mammals are nearly scentless in order to prevent predators from finding them. When humans touch these animals, they are imparting them with a scent their adults will not recognize or even fear. This can result in true abandonment of healthy offspring. If you suspect a baby animal has been abandoned, call your local wildlife agency and report it.

 

STATE LEGISLATURE TO WRAP UP WORK THIS WEEK

Lawmakers are racing to the finish, trying to wrap up the 2013 session by midnight Wednesday. There’s a lot still pending, including new regulations for the legalization of marijuana.  Lawmakers could impose a tax or a possible elimination of the voter-approved amendment. New oversight on the oil and gas industry, taxes on online sales, and driver’s licenses for people in the country illegally are also pending. Democratic leaders insist they’ll have everything done on time and there won’t be a need for a special session.  However, lawmakers won’t just be scrambling to complete work on pending bills. Some of them will also be busy trying to resurrect bills that have failed. Senate President John Morse gave notice that he may seek another vote on a rejected bill to tap rural telephone subsidies to pay for rural broadband service. Meanwhile, the clock has started ticking on contentious bills that Governor John Hickenlooper has to decide on — including an elections overhaul that includes same-day registration, a strengthening of labor rights for firefighters, and more legal remedies for discrimination cases on small businesses. Lawmakers may be waiting for weeks before they find out.

 

STATE ATTORNEY GENERAL RACE HEATING UP

Former Adams County District Attorney Don Quick is scheduled to formally launch his candidacy for Colorado Attorney General today at the west steps of the state Capitol.  Quick, a Democrat, is seeking to replace Attorney General John Suthers in the 2014 elections. Suthers, a Republican, is term limited. Republican Representative Mark Waller, the GOP’s House leader, is expected to announce his candidacy for the position later this summer.

 

ANOTHER GUN ACCESSORY MANUFACTURER LEAVES COLORADO


A company that makes gun sights and other firearms accessories says it’s pulling its core operations from Colorado following recent gun control measures and setting up shop in Laramie. HiViz Shooting Systems, based in Fort Collins, manufactures sights, recoil pads and other shooting accessories. The company’s management has been open about its dissatisfaction with recent Colorado gun control legislation. Wyoming Governor Matt Mead announced he welcomes HiViz to Wyoming. The governor’s office says the company intends to set up operations in Laramie with 14 employees with more to come later this year. Mead’s office has been courting firearms companies to relocate to Wyoming.

In high school sports:
Over the weekend:

In girls soccer:
Moffat County beat Grand Junction Central (1-0).

In baseball:
Steamboat beat Summit in both games of their double header (9-2; 12-4).
Moffat County fell to Roaring Fork in both games of a double header (16-4; 7-1).

In boys lacrosse:
Steamboat beat Grand Junction (11-9).

In girls lacrosse:
Steamboat fell to Durango (10-8).

Tomorrow:
In baseball:
Moffat County will host a double header with Steamboat.  The first game starts at 4.

In girls soccer:
Steamboat will play a first round playoff game at Windsor at 7.