NORTHWEST COLORADO NEWS AND SPORTS FOR MONDAY, JANUARY 7TH

TIPTON SAYS FISCAL DEAL DOES NOTHING FOR NATIONAL DEBT

Congressman Scott Tipton talked with KRAI and 55 Country last week, and expressed concern over the “fiscal cliff deal”.  Tipton says the compromise reached in Washington doesn’t solve the nations biggest problem.  He says the deal does nothing to increase the fiscal stability of the U.S.  He says, in fact, we are looking at another potential downgrade for the credit worthiness of America.  Tipton was one of the few who voted against the deal.  He says he’s frustrated at what he’s seeing as “business as usual in Washington.”

 

SNOWPACK LEVELS GETTING BETTER, STILL WAY BEHIND

The Natural Resources Conservation Service says Colorado’s snowpack is still below average but improved significantly over the past month.  Phyllis Ann Philipps, state conservationist with the service, says “conditions could have been much worse if we had not received the moisture we did in December.”  As of January 1st, Colorado’s statewide snowpack was 70 percent of average – the fourth lowest in the last 32 years. But the figure increased significantly since December 1st, when the snowpack was only 36 percent of average.  Mountain precipitation was 112 percent of average for December, but dry conditions in October and November statewide have kept precipitation totals below average.  Statewide reservoir storage is about 68 percent of average.

 

EIA SAYS COAL PRODUCTION IS UP IN COLORADO FOR 2012

Data collected by the U.S. Energy Information Center (EIA) shows that coal production in Colorado increased by 9.9 percent in the past year.  In contrast, Wyoming’s coal production has gone down by 9 percent during the same period.  The EIA also expects numbers to show coal consumption dropped in 2012, to the lowest amount in 20 years. Lower natural gas prices to power plants, and natural gas and renewable energy mandates are a few of the reasons. EIA expects power plants to increase their coal consumption by 5 percent this year, due to higher natural gas prices.

 

BLM ANNOUNCES CHANGES TO WILD HORSE AND BURRO POLICY

The Bureau of Land Management has announced a policy – in the form of what’s known as an interim Instruction Memorandum – regarding new conditions and restrictions on wild horse and burro sales. The new policy was prompted by the BLM’s overall effort to improve its management and care of wild horses and burros that roam Western public rangelands.  The policy states, among other things, that no more than 4 horses or wild burros may be bought by the BLM by an individual or group within a six month period, and must provide information about their own facilities.  Buyers must also provide their own transportation for the animals they purchase, and must submit to trailer inspections.  The BLM encourages anyone who has observed inhumane treatment or the sale to a slaughterhouse of a federally protected wild horse or burro, or who has factual information about such an incident, to contact the Bureau’s hotline at 866-4MUSTANGS (866-468-7826) with your name, contact information, and specific information about what you saw or know about.

STATE MAY PREVENT NON-RESIDENTS FROM SMOKING POT

Colorado may consider allowing only state residents to use marijuana recreationally after voters approved a measure to legalize use of the drug for non-medical purposes.  A marijuana regulatory group appointed by Governor John Hickenlooper started work last week working on the details of pot regulation. The group members won’t make rules, but they’re recommendations could shape how Colorado will become one of the nation’s first states to regulate marijuana like alcohol.  One of the topics before one of the working groups is whether there should be some sort of a residency requirement for growing, selling or even using marijuana. Colorado currently has a two-year residency requirement for medical marijuana licenses, a constitutionally questionable requirement that’s never been tested in court.  Residency requirements for recreational use are likely to be a divisive topic. Tourism is Colorado’s 2nd most lucrative industry, but some don’t want to see the state become a magnet for marijuana tourism. Others say out-of-state visitors shouldn’t be subject to different rules from residents.

 

HEALTH OFFICIALS PROMOTE CERVICAL CANCER AWARENESS

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month, and women across Colorado are encouraged to start the year by talking with their healthcare providers about scheduling a pap test. A pap test is the first line of defense against cervical cancer. When it’s found early, more than 92 percent of women survive cervical cancer.  Under health care reform, insurance plans are required to cover women’s preventive health services, like pap tests, without charging co-pays.  Every year in the U.S., approximately 13,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer and about 4,000 women die of the disease. Latinos and African-American women are at higher risk for developing cervical cancer because many are less likely to get early screening.

In HIGH SCHOOL Wrestling OVER WEEKEND:

Moffat County competed against nineteen teams at the Las Vegas Tournament and had five wrestlers placing:

113 lbs – Ashley Griffith 5th
138 lbs – Brayden Peterson 5th
145 lbs – Garrett Stewart 4th
152 lbs – Jacob Teeter 4th
180 lbs – Jesse deMoor 4th

On Friday Moffat County won all four of it’s duals