Daily Archives: October 23, 2012

NORTHWEST COLORADO NEWS FOR TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23RD

 

TREES HARVESTED TO ACCOMPANY NATIONAL CHRISTMAS TREE

Last week, the Colorado State Forest Service harvested 75 subalpine fir trees from the Colorado State Forest near Gould to accompany the official U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree in Washington, D.C. These companion trees will ultimately spend the holidays in U.S. government offices.  CSFS foresters obtained the trees with the help of North Park students from grades 5-8, and transported them to Fort Collins on October 19th to be prepared for their journey to Washington, D.C., in November.  Earlier this year, the CSFS also provided 5,000 tree “cookies” – ½-inch-wide cross-sections of small tree trunks – to students around Colorado to be decorated as ornaments to adorn the Capitol Christmas Tree and its companion trees. CSFS foresters and volunteers obtained some of these cookies from bark beetle-killed trees or trees that burned in the High Park Fire area near Fort Collins. The ornaments also will make the journey to the Capitol next month.  This year’s Capitol Christmas Tree is being obtained from National Forest land near Meeker. To learn more about the Capitol Christmas Tree or track its journey around Colorado and to Washington, click here.

 

ROMNEY/RYAN SUPPORTERS GATHER FOR DEBATE WATCH PARTY IN CRAIG

About 35 people stuck around for last night’s “Debate Watch” party in Craig.  The group of Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan supporters watched together as President Barack Obama and Governor Mitt Romney debated foreign policy on national television.  The event followed a Romney/Ryan Rally at the hotel.  Those who showed up were served hot dogs, hamburgers, and drinks.  “Coal County” t-shirts were given away.  Early voting for the presidential election is going on until November 2nd.  Mail-in ballots must be received by 7 the evening of Election Day.

 

RYAN STUMPING FOR ROMNEY IN COLORADO

Paul Ryan is in Colorado stumping for Mitt Romney surrounding last night’s presidential debate.  The Republican vice presidential candidate was in Pueblo yesterday morning for a speech before traveling to Durango.  He was in Grand Junction yesterday evening where he watched the last debate, which focused on foreign policy.  Ryan’s visit comes during a week when both campaigns are courting voters in Colorado, where the race is expected to be close.  The economy seems to be the biggest factor when determining who voters want as president for the next 4 years.  When asked which issues would most determine their selection for president, 70% of respondents at krai.com overwhelmingly chose the economy as their greatest concern.  48% included the national debt in their concerns, 37% said energy issues were most important, and 33% chose help for the middle class.  Taxes and Health care came next at 29%, with very few choosing social security and the environment.  A new question has been posted that asks “now that the debates are over, who is your choice for president?”  Romney and Ryan will be rallying today in Colorado’s famous Red Rocks amphitheater. President Barack Obama will be back in Colorado tomorrow to speak at Denver’s City Park.

 

BREAK-IN AT MJK SUNDAY NIGHT

MJK Sales and Feed was broken into Sunday night. The Craig Police Department said the burglary occurred sometime after 10:30. In addition to damage to computers and surveillance equipment, two small safes were taken during the break-in. The Police Department is not releasing additional details at this time. Due to the burglary investigation, MJK is closed until further notice.

 

BLM SHARES PHOTOS FROM “GUZZLERS”

The Bureau of Land Management, Colorado is sharing some unique photos of wildlife with the public. Wildlife Biologists at the Royal Gorge Field Office use water tanks or “guzzlers,” to manage grazing and increase water access for wildlife. The BLM placed still cameras or “critter cams,” on public lands along the Front Range to monitor wildlife using the water tanks. Not only do the cameras provide valuable data to the biologists, but they also tend to capture some amazing close-up photos of animals not typically seen on a day-to-day basis.  In one incident, the BLM constructed a fence around one particular guzzler to protect it from migrating cattle, while still allowing large wildlife, such as deer and elk, to jump over the fence and continue to drink the water. A camera placed at this site proved the animals were not using the guzzler due to the fence. The biologists realized that they needed to step in and resolved the problem by removing the fence. Without the cameras the biologists wouldn’t have known there was a problem at the site.  The BLM is now sharing photos with the public. Through the BLM’s various social media avenues, you can view the photos of bear, elk, bighorn sheep, turkeys, bobcats and deer from the “critter cam.”

 

MARIJUANA OPPONENTS AND SUPPORTERS SPEND OVER $3 MILLION IN ADS

Over $3 million has been spent, so far, on advertising for Colorado’s Amendment 64.  The measure, if passed, would make it legal for adults 21 and over to possess small amounts of marijuana for personal recreational use.  It would also allow residents to grow their own marijuana.  At this point, supporters and opponents have spent upwards of $3.7 million to push their positions.  Much of that money has come from outside the state.  If Amendment 64 passes, it won’t trump federal laws, which still consider the drug illegal.  The measure appears on this year’s general election ballot.